World Waternet, Netherlands Water Partnership (NWP) and Aqua for All initiated the biennial dr. Sarphati Sanitation Award (SSA) in 2013 to honor the outstanding contribution of individuals or organizations to the global sanitation and public health challenge through entrepreneurship.

Award Categories
As a result of the evaluation of the 2013 process, it was decided to extend the SSA from 1 to 2 prizes, adding a Life Time Achievement in Sanitation Award next to the existing Young Entrepreneurial Sanitation Business Award. While entrepreneurship will be acknowledged by the Young Entrepreneurial Sanitation Business, there is a range of organizations and individuals which have contributed to put Sanitation for All as a priority on national and local political, societal and business agenda’s. This second Award, for Life Time Achievement, will acknowledge the contribution of parties which have achieved a

remarkable impact on the access to sanitation for people at the Base of the Pyramid. Therefore, in 2015, the Sarphati Sanitation Award will be twofold to acknowledge different contributions to the sector:

  • Sarphati Sanitation Award for Life Time Achievement in Sanitation
  • Sarphati Sanitation Award for Young Entrepreneurial Sanitation Business

The secretariat for the Sarphati Sanitation Awards 2015 will be hosted by Aqua for All who holds office in The Hague. For any information please send an e-mail to Sarphati2015@aquaforall.org or h.foppen@aquaforall.org.

Procedure Sarphati Sanitation Awards 2015 

  1. Nominations will be done by a Nomination Committee, consisting of experts from the sanitation sector, acknowledged visionaries and funding agencies.
  2. For these nominations, a Terms of Reference is developed, to identify potential candidates.
  3. The Nomination Committee will bring a long list of potential candidates for both prizes back to a short list of 6 nominees per prize, and will present these short lists to the Jury.
  4. Both awards are subject to a set of criteria, to be applied by the jury.
  5. The jury will make her selection and appoint two winners.
  6. During the ceremony, three nominees for each prize will be mentioned and publicly honored.
  7. The Sarphati Sanitation laureate for both awards will be presented with an award certificate, a figurine designed by the Dutch artist Marte Röling and a cash prize. The amount for the cash prize is still to be determined, with a minimum of € 25,000 for each prize.
  8. Procedures for the Jury prescribe for each Award to select three (3) nominees of which one laureate, to be invited to the SSA-Ceremony during the International Water Week in Amsterdam in November 2015.

Criteria for the Sarphati Sanitation Awards
Criteria for the Sarphati Sanitation Award for Life Time Achievement in Sanitation

  • The nominee has an outstanding track record in the field of sanitation and the Sarphati Sanitation Award will recognize the impact of this achievement for the sector.
  • The nominee inspires new generations to become involved in finding sustainable solutions to the sanitation challenge.
  • The nominee has proven experience in linking different partners from the public and the private sector in the quest to improve the sanitation situation.
  • The nominee has contributed to ground-breaking innovations in the field of sanitation related to public health, preferably through a multi-sectorial approach.
  • The nominee’s work has contributed to achieving and is expected to contribute to Sustainable Development Goal 6.2: Ensure all have access to sanitation (sewage and good waste management) and public education on healthy hygiene habits.

Criteria for the Sarphati Sanitation Award for Young Entrepreneurial Sanitation Business

  • The nominee has an outstanding track record in the field of sanitation and the Sarphati Sanitation Award will increase his or her impact in that field.
  • The nominee inspires new generations to become involved in finding sustainable solutions to the sanitation challenge.
  • The nominee has proven experience in linking different partners from the public and the private sector in the quest to improve the sanitation situation and public health, through an entrepreneurial approach.
  • The nominee has contributed to ground-breaking innovations in the field of sanitation.
  • The nominee’s work has stimulated other sectors to get involved in the sanitation challenge.

Winner 2013
In 2013 Sanergy won the Sarphati Sanitation Award. Sanergy was established in 2010. Sanergy is first winner of the Sarphati Sanitation Award. Sanergy is a social enterprise dedicated to building healthy, prosperous communities by making hygienic sanitation accessible and affordable, for everyone, forever – starting in informal settlements in Nairobi, Kenya. They installed their first toilet in the Mukuru kwa Reuben area of Nairobi on November 19, 2011.

Which major achievement have you made since winning the award?
“As of June 2015, Sanergy has installed more than 700 Fresh Life Toilets in Nairobi’s informal settlements, we have removed more than 5,400 metric tons of waste from the community, and we have created over 700 jobs.”

What are the future plans?
“ Currently, Sanergy is exploring additional distribution models for the Fresh Life Toilets, including partnering with landlords for a residential toilet model and with schools to provide hygienic sanitation to students.”

For more information about Sanergy please visit their website and keep up to date.

About Samuel Sarphati
Samuel Sarphati (Amsterdam, January 31, 1813 – there, June 23, 1866) was a Jewish doctor, chemist, philanthropist and entrepreneur with a very broad field of interest, He played an important role in the development of education, health, urban development and industry of Amsterdam in the middle of the 19th century. Sarphati was an all-rounder and often ran with his initiative firmly in the Amsterdam bureaucracy, and was able to reach breakthroughs for the urban poor with his innovative mindset and persistent attitude.

He finished his studies on June 27, 1839 at Leiden University and established himself as a doctor in Amsterdam. His practice confronted him with the poor living conditions: eight percent of the population lived in basements, half of the children was at a school for the poor and the population statistics resembled those of a nowadays third world city: high birth and mortality and on top of the stench of sulfur, fertilizer and garbage. Many of Sarphati’s activities aimed to improve the quality of life of large parts of the population. He designed an expansion plan for Amsterdam, built an abattoir, he founded the Dutch Society for the Advancement of Pharmacy in 1842. He also founded the first bread factory in the Netherlands, on the Vijzelgracht, with a weekly production of 9,000
affordable loafs of bread. For the emerging industry, he founded the bank Credit Mobilier. In 1842 he co-founded a private Trading Academy in Amsterdam. Especially since the mid-forties he developed his organizational talent.

In 1847 he received a permit to collect waste and founded the Society for the Promotion of Agriculture and Land Reclamation. In 1852 he founded the Association of Industry and in 1855 the Society for Flour and bread factories which bread was offering thirty percent below the baker price. This kind of effort resulted around 1870 in an increase in average life expectancy in Amsterdam. Furthermore, he influenced the urban expansion with projects such as the Palace of Industry and the Amstel Hotel. His ambitious plans took decades to complete and gave him the nickname “Amsterdamsche Haussmann”. Sarphati would not experience the realization of many of his plans. What he witnessed was the realization of the monumental and modern Palace of Industry at the Frederiksplein (now De Nederlandsche Bank). Consisting mainly of iron and glass seemed this industrial and exhibition building at the Palais de l’Industrie in Paris or the Crystal Palace in London.

This kind of work earned him accolades on. King William III appointed him in 1860 as Officer in the Order of the Oak Crown and at the opening of the Palace of Industry in 1864 to Knight in the Order of the Dutch Lion.

The 53-year-old Sarphati died in June 1866, three months after the first stone of ‘his’ Amstel Hotel. Sarphati had married Abigail Mendes de Leon. The marriage remained childless. He was buried in the Portuguese Jewish cemetery Beth Haim in Ouderkerk aan de Amstel.